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Dreamers in America

Dreamers. Photo by Steve Rhodes CC Flickr.

Dreamers. Photo by Steve Rhodes CC Flickr.

Jacob is on the move. He has had to leave his home, and journey to Haran to live under the protection of his uncle Laban. He is alone. It is night time, and he lies down and falls asleep. Suddenly in a dream, a ladder appears with angels going up and down. In the morning he awakens and realizes, “Surely God is in this place, and I did not know it.”

In the aftermath of the election that has left many of us stunned and filled with trepidation, we wonder what we can do now to prevent the protections we have enjoyed as Americans from unraveling. Here is one place to begin.

In a 2012 executive order, President Obama created the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program for DREAMers, undocumented immigrants who were brought to the United States as children, grew up in the United States, and want to give back to society and raise their own families in the only nation they know as home. Now participants in and applicants to DACA are in a vulnerable state. Their names and contact information are now known to the federal government, and if the succeeding administration seeks to deport all undocumented immigrants as it stated repeatedly during the campaign, and has restated in the past few weeks, the DACA program provides a robust list. Urge President Obama to take action to protect DREAMers and ensure our nation lives up to its proud history as a nation of immigrants by submitting your letter of support at the Religious Action Center of Reform Judaism (RAC), where you will also find more information and contact number. Urge everyone you know to do the same.

Jacob’s dream was for God’s protection. The dream of all these people is to live in America in peace and security, and create productive lives for themselves and their families.

Unwilling Immigrant

joseph-attacked-by-his-brothers-chagall

Joseph Attacked by His Brothers by Marc Chagall 1957

This week we begin the Joseph cycle within the Genesis narrative. Since his younger brother Benjamin has not been born as yet, Joseph is still the youngest of the sons of Jacob, the son of Jacob’s beloved Rachel, and, as the text tells us, “the son of his old age.” And, he was his father’s favorite. In defiance of convention, Jacob designates Joseph as the one who will inherit his estate and the leadership of his people. Joseph’s brothers are understandably infuriated. When the opportunity presents itself, they throw Joseph into a pit, and then sell him to the Midianites, who take him off to Egypt. Once there, he is thrown into the dungeon as a slave.

Can we even try to imagine the gripping fear that Joseph must have experienced – the dislocation of leaving his homeland and his family, and everything that was familiar and comforting to him? Ultimately Joseph became assimilated into Egyptian society; changed his name, his appearance, his language, and rose to great political heights. We might identify Joseph’s experience as paradigmatic of the immigrant experience. Of course, this one turned out well. But as we know, in reality, there are no guarantees.

Whatever our political persuasions may be, there can be no denying the stark reality of Jewish teaching, tradition, and historical experience. Beginning in the 4th century of the Common Era, the notion that Jews not only rejected Jesus but actually were responsible for his crucifixion and death, became a central theme of Christian dogma, and the raison d’être of Jew hatred and persecution, to this day. And the litany is long and sad. 11th century, the Crusades. 12th century, the first blood libel. 13th century, the Expulsion from England. 14th century, the Expulsion from France. 15th century, the Expulsion from Spain. 16th century, Martin Luther and the Protestant Reformation brought a new level of anti-Jewish policies and rhetoric to Europe. 17th century, the Chelmnicki Massacres in Poland. 18th century, ghettoization and exclusion in Russia. 19th century, legal and economic ostracism in Germany, and vicious pogroms in Russia, that sent so many of our grandparents and great-grandparents running for their lives to America, the “Goldene Medina.” 20th century, the Shoah. Following the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948, over a million Jews were expelled from surrounding Arab countries: Egypt, Yemen, Libya, Syria, Algeria, Jordan, Iraq, and elsewhere, and they sought refuge in Israel. Some 15,000 Jews were rescued from Ethiopia and brought to Israel. Over a million Jews from the Former Soviet Union sought refuge in Israel, and many others in the United States.

“You know the heart of the stranger, for you were strangers in the land of Egypt.” No fewer than 36 times our Torah admonishes us regarding our obligations to refugees and strangers in our midst. This is Jewish teaching. This is the Jewish way. As Americans, we have the right and the prerogative to support the candidate(s) of our choice with as much energy as we can muster. Our support ought to come as well with our demands of our candidates that they support policies that honor our sensitivities as Jewish Americans. As our political process unfolds during this rather extraordinary presidential campaign, it behooves us to keep this in mind, whatever our personal political positions may be.

A Shelter of Peace

eiffel-tower-tricolor-2-Yann-Caradec

The Eiffel Tower lit with the French tricolor after the Paris terrorist attack on November 13, 2015. Courtesy Yann Caradec CC.

This past Friday night and Saturday, the peace of our Shabbat was pierced by the unspeakable violence and brutality of the coordinated terrorist attacks in Paris. Our hearts go out to those who are mourning loved ones, and our prayers for healing go out to those who were wounded. It is as though this wanton attack on the City of Lights has driven a dagger into the heart of the world. And, as many world leaders and local police chiefs have observed, it is, in many ways, a game changer for all of us.

In light of the vicious attacks upon the people of Paris, we need to acknowledge as well that which has been all too conspicuously absent from the headlines. That is the spate of terrorist attacks that have killed innocent people elsewhere as well. And to this I say “mea culpa.” My attention as well has been focused on Paris, far more than anywhere else in recent days. But here are the facts that we dare not forget as compassionate members of the human race. The following is just a sampling of terrorist attacks that have taken place just in this calendar year of 2015, not including those in Israel:

January 3-7: Boko Haram militants attacked in Baga, Nigeria. Death toll ranged from 150 to 2,000 people. It was the worst death toll for an attack carried out by Boko Haram, which has claimed responsibility for dozens of attacks with deaths ranging from just a few to hundreds of people over several years.

January 7: Two al-Qaeda-linked gunmen killed 11 people at the Charlie Hebdo magazine in Paris and killed a police officer outside. A total of 17 people and three gunmen died in bloodshed, including an attack on a kosher market.

April 3: 147 people, mostly students, at Garissa University in Kenya are killed in an attack; al-Shabaab claims responsibility.

October 10: Suicide bombers detonated devices in Ankara and killed about 100 people in the Turkish capital. Investigators suspected Islamic State-linked perpetrators.

November 12: A pair of suicide bombings struck southern Beirut on Thursday, killing 43 people and leaving shattered glass and blood on the streets, Lebanese authorities said. At least 239 others were wounded, according to the state-run National News Agency.

These and similar attacks remind us that it is almost as though we take for granted the atmosphere of violence and brutality in Asia and Africa, and the Middle East, to the point where we and our media take scant notice of it. It is not my intent to point fingers, or speak with a “holier than thou” attitude. I have no business doing that, and admittedly my own more immediate attention has indeed been focused on Israel and Paris, even as I worry as well about our safety here in New York and elsewhere in the United States. Yet, if we are going to engage in a war on terrorism that has any hope of succeeding, we can’t afford to insulate ourselves from terrorism that targets innocent people, no matter where they live.

In our Torah portion we read: Jacob awoke from his slumber and exclaimed: Surely God is in this place and I – I did not know it!

As a society, and as peace-loving people, we cannot afford to forget about our fellow human beings who are suffering. The following is an excerpt from a posting last Saturday night by the Israel Movement for Progressive Judaism:

Fighting evil, and that which is done supposedly in the name of God, is a great moral and religious duty. It must take place harshly and without compromise. At the same time, it is imperative that in every location, we work toward a better social, economic, cultural and political world order, which promotes hope and partnership between all of humanity. It is crucial that we fight not only the murderers and their senders, but also despair, hatred, and idol worship.

We pray that a Sukkat Shalom – a shelter of peace – be spread speedily upon the City of Lights and that it soon see again love, freedom, equality and fraternity.

“And I will give peace in the land, and you shall lie down, and none shall make you afraid; and I will cause evil beasts to cease out of the land, neither shall the sword go through your land.” (Leviticus 26.6)