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You shall appoint magistrates and officials for your tribes, in all the settlements that the Lord your God is giving you, and they shall govern the people with due justice. You shall not judge unfairly: you shall show no partiality; you shall not take bribes, for bribes blind the eyes of the discerning and upset the plea of the just. Justice, justice shall you pursue, that you may thrive and occupy the land that the Lord your God is giving you. (Deuteronomy 16.18-20)

Our Torah portion this week contains one of the most well-known commandments concerning the formation of a just society. The leaders whom we, the people, set in authority, are charged with the responsibility to govern impartially, and not allow themselves to be influenced by the promise of personal financial gain, or swayed by personal prejudice.

Last week, the President of the United States tried to present a façade of impartiality—at least some may think that’s what it was—in condemning violence and hatred “on all sides” in Charlottesville, VA. But this case, as it were, has already been tried and settled. Nazism is the very embodiment of evil, and has wrought nothing but hatred, violence, brutality and genocide. This was not a time for impartiality. In this case, justice required clear and swift condemnation from the leader of the free world. But when it finally came, it was too little, too late.

The pursuit of justice is not the interest of this president. Because of this, the Reform, Conservative, and Reconstructionist Rabbinic bodies of North America have jointly arrived at a painful and sad decision. Every year before the High Holy Days, we arrange a joint conference call with the President of the United States. Whether Republican or Democrat, presidents have understood the importance of addressing and speaking with Rabbinic leadership of this country, particularly at this solemn and sensitive time of year. This year, however, in light of the outrageous and unacceptable behavior of this president, our Rabbinic organizations have jointly decided to forego this phone call. We are not interested in speaking with this president, and must make this joint statement of opposition to his behavior and his words over these past eight months, and particularly in light of these most recent ghastly events.

The statement of our organizations appears below. This is a sad day in America.

Rabbis Forgo Annual High Holy Days Call with President
Wednesday, August 23, 2017

The High Holy Days are an opportunity for reflection and introspection. As the leaders of major denominations in American Jewish life, we have been deeply engaged in both, considering the events of the Jewish year that is ending and preparing spiritually for the year to come.

In so doing, we have thoughtfully and prayerfully considered whether to continue the practice in recent years of playing key roles in organizing a conference call for the President of the United States to bring High Holy Day greetings to American rabbis. We have concluded that President Trump’s statements during and after the tragic events in Charlottesville are so lacking in moral leadership and empathy for the victims of racial and religious hatred that we cannot organize such a call this year.

The President’s words have given succor to those who advocate anti-Semitism, racism, and xenophobia. Responsibility for the violence that occurred in Charlottesville, including the death of Heather Heyer, does not lie with many sides but with one side: the Nazis, alt-right and white supremacists who brought their hate to a peaceful community. They must be roundly condemned at all levels.

The High Holy Days are a season of t’shuvah for us all, an opportunity for each of us to examine our own words and deeds through the lens of America’s ongoing struggle with racism. Our tradition teaches us that humanity is fallible yet also capable of change. We pray that President Trump will recognize and remedy the grave error he has made in abetting the voices of hatred. We pray that those who traffic in anti-Semitism, racism, and xenophobia will see that there is no place for such pernicious philosophies in a civilized society. And we pray that 5778 will be a year of peace for all.

Central Conference of American Rabbis
The Rabbinical Assembly
Reconstructionist Rabbinical Association
Religious Action Center of Reform Judaism