Union for Reform Judaism Member Congregation

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Sukkah. Photo: courtesy of teofilo CC Flickr

Sukkah. Photo: courtesy of teofilo CC Flickr

The sukkah has come to symbolize a shelter a peace. But the structure of a sukkah speaks powerfully to the nature of such shelter. While the roof of the sukkah is covered with branches and leaves (s’chach) to provide shade, we must also always be able to look up and see the sunlight by day, and the moonlight by night. The sukkah should be strong enough to withstand a substantial wind, but by its very nature, it is a temporary structure, and ultimately vulnerable to the elements. Perhaps this teaches us an important lesson. While we gather together as a community for companionship, celebration, comfort, and mutual support, we can never delude ourselves into believing that we can shut out the world entirely, to the point of ignoring all that is going on outside our own shelters of peace. On the contrary, the comfort and delight of our own sukkot need to remind us not only of our gratitude for all we have, but also of our responsibilities to those less fortunate than ourselves.
A reminder: Please remember our food basket during this Festival of Sukkot. Bring unopened canned or boxed food to the temple, and we then will bring it to a local food pantry. And, from house to house, I wish you Mo’adim L’simchah, Chagim Uz’manim L’sasson – Seasons of joy and feasts of gladness.